Latest News: Linux shell script to change you ssh port

2017/03

Block SSH Brute Force Attacks Using SSHGuard
Tutorial

Block SSH Brute Force Attacks Using SSHGuard

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 437 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

SSHGuard is a fast and lightweight monitoring tool written in C language. It monitors and protects servers  from brute force attacks using their logging activity. If someone continuously trying to access your server via SSH with many(may be four) unsuccessful attempts, the SSHGuard will block him/her for a bit by putting their IP address in iptables. Then it releases the lock automatically after sometime. Not only SSH, it protects almost all services such as sendmail, exim, dovecot, vsftpd, prof...

Determine Your Specifications from Command-Line
Tutorial

Determine Your Specifications from Command-Line

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 411 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

We recently published article about how to determine your computer’s architecture via GUI. Today am going to show how to do the same thing from the command-line with more advanced options in viewing the computer hardware properties as well. Checking computer hardware properties from the commandline can be done using the following commands. The commands below give you more information about your computer hardware ranging from Architecture, Number of CPU(s), Vendor ID, CPU family, CPU MHz, etc. Th...

Use Terminal as a Web Browser
Tutorial

Use Terminal as a Web Browser

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 382 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

Web browsers are software used to access and view the internet and webpages. We all know about some of the popular web browsers such as Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Opera and others. Surfing the web from the command-line can be somehow scrappy, but you can give it a try as well. Most users doesn’t know that they can browse the web from the command-line. w3m w3m is a World Wide Web (WWW) text based client. It has English and Japanese help files and an option menu and can be configured to use e...

Installing Telnet In CentOS/RHEL/Scientific Linux 6 & 7
Tutorial

Installing Telnet In CentOS/RHEL/Scientific Linux 6 & 7

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 372 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

Disclaimer: Before installing and using Telnet, keep the following in mind. Using Telnet in public network(WAN) is very very bad idea. It transmits login data in the clear format. Everything will be sent in plain text. If you still need Telnet, It is highly recommended use it in the local area network only. Alternatively, you can use SSH. But make sure you’ve disabled root login in SSH. What Is Telnet? Telnet is a network protocol which is used to connect to remote computers over TCP/IP network....

Ten ‘Top’ Command Examples
Tutorial

Ten ‘Top’ Command Examples

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 411 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

The “top” command provides a dynamic real-time view of a running system. It can display system summary information as well as a list of processes or threads currently being managed by the Linux kernel. The types of system summary information shown and the types, order and size of information displayed for processes are all user configurable and that configuration can be made persistent across restarts. Here are some top command examples. If we type ‘top’ in terminal, this is how our output looks...

How to Disable SSH Root Login in GNU/Linux
Tutorial

How to Disable SSH Root Login in GNU/Linux

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 374 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

As we all know, root SSH login is enabled by default in GNU/Linux. We can easily access our remote servers and manage them if they have any issues via SSH. But it is not advisable to allow directly login as root user via SSH, because anyone can brute force root password and will try to access your servers. It’s better to have a separate user account and you can get root privileges by using su command if necessary. This handy tutorial will describe you how to disable root SSH login in GNU/Linux s...

How to Install Latest GIT on RHEL 6/CentOS 6
Tutorial

How to Install Latest GIT on RHEL 6/CentOS 6

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 335 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

So you want to setup a GIT Repository for your developers on RHEL 6/CentOS 6, but notice Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 contains 1.7.1 in the repositories, which is well behind the current 1.8.3 that is available for GIT at http://git-scm.com. Well no need to worry, it is easy enough to download and install the latest on a typical RHEL/CentOS installation. First let’s download all the files that are required for GIT installation: [crayon-5bcd1241290eb728114111/] Next, install all required libraries ...

Monitor Per Process Network Bandwidth Usage with Nethogs
Tutorial

Monitor Per Process Network Bandwidth Usage with Nethogs

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 348 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

NetHogs is an open-source, small ‘net top’ tool. Instead of breaking the traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process. NetHogs does not rely on a special kernel module to be loaded. If there’s suddenly a lot of network traffic, you can fire up NetHogs and immediately see which PID is causing this. This makes it easy to identify programs that have gone wild and are suddenly taking up your bandwidth. Install NetHogs On RHEL/CentOS, NetHogs is not avai...

How to Harden Your Linux Servers Security with Bastille
Tutorial

How to Harden Your Linux Servers Security with Bastille

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 392 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

The Bastille hardening program “locks down” an operating system, pro-actively configuring the system for increased security and decreasing its susceptibility to compromise and downtime. Bastille can also assess a system’s current state of hardening, granularly reporting on each of the security settings with which it works. It currently supports the Red Hat (Fedora, Enterprise, and Numbered/Classic), SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo, Mandrake, Mac OS X and HP-UX. Bastille’s focuses on letting the sys...

Play With Directory Stack
Tutorial

Play With Directory Stack

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 328 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

Sometimes we work with long paths in directories and it is hard to remember all of them. What about popping them when we need them? There is a solution to this, it is called directory stack. As the name suggests, a directory stack is a stack in which we can push and pop directories when we need them. The directory stack is based on the principle of LIFO. What is LIFO? LIFO means last in, first out. The last directory pushed in the stack will be the first directory which will go out of the stack....