Latest News: Linux shell script to change you ssh port

Tutorial

Tutorial and relative

How to Install Latest GIT on RHEL 6/CentOS 6

How to Install Latest GIT on RHEL 6/CentOS 6

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 348 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

So you want to setup a GIT Repository for your developers on RHEL 6/CentOS 6, but notice Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 contains 1.7.1 in the repositories, which is well behind the current 1.8.3 that is available for GIT at http://git-scm.com. Well no need to worry, it is easy enough to download and install the latest on a typical RHEL/CentOS installation. First let’s download all the files that are required for GIT installation: [crayon-5beb8a8ebc61c041970430/] Next, install all required libraries ...

Monitor Per Process Network Bandwidth Usage with Nethogs

Monitor Per Process Network Bandwidth Usage with Nethogs

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 362 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

NetHogs is an open-source, small ‘net top’ tool. Instead of breaking the traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process. NetHogs does not rely on a special kernel module to be loaded. If there’s suddenly a lot of network traffic, you can fire up NetHogs and immediately see which PID is causing this. This makes it easy to identify programs that have gone wild and are suddenly taking up your bandwidth. Install NetHogs On RHEL/CentOS, NetHogs is not avai...

How to Harden Your Linux Servers Security with Bastille

How to Harden Your Linux Servers Security with Bastille

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 405 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

The Bastille hardening program “locks down” an operating system, pro-actively configuring the system for increased security and decreasing its susceptibility to compromise and downtime. Bastille can also assess a system’s current state of hardening, granularly reporting on each of the security settings with which it works. It currently supports the Red Hat (Fedora, Enterprise, and Numbered/Classic), SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo, Mandrake, Mac OS X and HP-UX. Bastille’s focuses on letting the sys...

Play With Directory Stack

Play With Directory Stack

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 341 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

Sometimes we work with long paths in directories and it is hard to remember all of them. What about popping them when we need them? There is a solution to this, it is called directory stack. As the name suggests, a directory stack is a stack in which we can push and pop directories when we need them. The directory stack is based on the principle of LIFO. What is LIFO? LIFO means last in, first out. The last directory pushed in the stack will be the first directory which will go out of the stack....

10 ‘cat’ Command Examples for Beginners

10 ‘cat’ Command Examples for Beginners

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 390 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

“cat” is one of the commands that is used mostly in our everyday activities, so far as the terminal is concerned. It is mostly used with text files for displaying, combining (concatenating) and creating new ones. Here are 10 useful examples of such cat commands for beginners. 1. Creating a new file The most common use of cat is viewing text files even though you can do this by using a GUI text editor like gedit, this is faster and saves you from all those double clicking. To create a new file yo...

Easy Navigation Through Your Folders

Easy Navigation Through Your Folders

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 313 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

Tired of typing long path names? Me too. I have a very good solution that will save you time and energy. Type less, be more productive. Forget the parent directory, if you want to go to a sub-directory just type ‘cd subdirectory’ in the terminal (without quotation marks). But how does this work? The trick here is the CDPATH environment variable, which is a variable that works only with the cd command. It is just like PATH environment variable, but the difference between PATH and CDPATH is that P...

How to Monitor Network Bandwidth with vnstat

How to Monitor Network Bandwidth with vnstat

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 345 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

There are many tools available to monitor our network bandwidth usage at a particular date and time. Those tools will collect and send the bandwidth usage to system or network admins to find out what’s going on in there network infrastructure. We have already shown you how to monitor network bandwidth using iftop tool. Well, today i have come back with a tool called vnstat. vnStat is a console-based network traffic monitor for Linux and BSD that keeps a log of network traffic for the selected in...

Scrot: A Command-Line Screenshot Tool

Scrot: A Command-Line Screenshot Tool

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 391 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

There are a lot ways to take screenshot in Linux. scrot is a very useful command-line tool for taking screenshots. scrot is pre-installed in most Linux distributions. When it is not installed, just run the basic installation command in your terminal. For Ubuntu: [crayon-5beb8a8ebe8e2084798392/] How do you use scrot to take screenshot? scrot takes screenshots quickly and silently. Take a screenshot of the whole desktop Open a terminal and type scrot then hit Enter. [crayon-5beb8a8ebe8e9951038461/...

How to Compile and Install a Linux Software from Source Code

How to Compile and Install a Linux Software from Source Code

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 361 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

Most often we do install software from the terminal by the help of  apt-get, rpm, yum, Ubuntu Software Center (GUI) and other forms on various Linux distributions. Sometimes it is good to download the source code of the software and compile it yourself. Most Linux newbies find this very difficult, since most of them are likely to have moved from Microsoft Windows OS, where they only surf the web and download executable files. Today we are going to learn how to make this difficult task very easy....

Ten ‘Find’ Command Examples for Beginners

Ten ‘Find’ Command Examples for Beginners

willing 2Year(s) Ago (2017-03-14) 371 View(s) 0 Comment(s)

find command is used for locate files in a directory hierarchy on Linux/Unix systems. You can search for files according to name, owner, group, type, permissions, date and other criteria. The search is recursive in that it will search all sub directories too. If you are a beginner, the following examples will make you clear about the find command. 1. Find full path of all files in the current and its sub-directories The following commands locate and display the full path names of all files in th...